MonthJanuary 2014

What’s WSDL?

Web Service Definition Language in short WSDL is an XML format for describing network services as a set of endpoints operating on messages containing either document-oriented or procedure oriented information.

WSDL is a

  • XML document written to describe a web service.
  • It specifies the location of the web service and the operations or methods the web service exposes.

A WSDL document uses the following elements in the definition of network services (Web services)

  • Types – a container for data type definitions. This describes the data. The XML schema Language(Known as XSD also) is used for this purpose.
  • Message – an abstract, typed definition of the data being communicated. The contains the information needed to perform the operation.
  • Operation – an abstract description of an action supported by a service. This defines the actions and the way the message is encoded.
  • Port Type – an abstract set of operations supported by one or more endpoints.
  • Binding – a concrete protocol and data format specification for a particular port type. Defines the interface and the binding style.
  • Port – a Single endpoint defined as a combination of a binding and a network address. It defines the address or the connection point to a web service.
  • Service – a collection of related endpoints
Representation of concepts defined by WSDL 1.1 and WSDL 2.0 documents.

Representation of concepts defined by WSDL 1.1 and WSDL 2.0 documents.

WSDL 1.2 has been renamed to WSDL 2.0,  because of the major differences, like

  • Removed message constructs.
  • Operator overloading not supported.
  • PortTypes renamed to interfaces.
  • Ports renamed to interfaces.
  • Added further semantics to the description language. 
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<description xmlns="http://www.w3.org/ns/wsdl" 
             xmlns:tns="http://www.tmsws.com/wsdl20sample" 
             xmlns:whttp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/http/"
             xmlns:wsoap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
             targetNamespace="http://www.tmsws.com/wsdl20sample">

<!-- Abstract type -->
   <types>
      <xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
                xmlns="http://www.tmsws.com/wsdl20sample"
                targetNamespace="http://www.example.com/wsdl20sample">

         <xs:element name="request"> ... </xs:element>
         <xs:element name="response"> ... </xs:element>
      </xs:schema>
   </types>

<!-- Abstract interfaces -->
   <interface name="Interface1">
      <fault name="Error1" element="tns:response"/>
      <operation name="Opp1" pattern="http://www.w3.org/ns/wsdl/in-out">
         <input messageLabel="In" element="tns:request"/>
         <output messageLabel="Out" element="tns:response"/>
      </operation>
   </interface>

<!-- Concrete Binding Over HTTP -->
   <binding name="HttpBinding" interface="tns:Interface1" 
            type="http://www.w3.org/ns/wsdl/http">
      <operation ref="tns:Get" whttp:method="GET"/>
   </binding>

<!-- Concrete Binding with SOAP-->
   <binding name="SoapBinding" interface="tns:Interface1" 
            type="http://www.w3.org/ns/wsdl/soap" 
            wsoap:protocol="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap/bindings/HTTP/"
            wsoap:mepDefault="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap/mep/request-response">
      <operation ref="tns:Get" />
   </binding>

<!-- Web Service offering endpoints for both bindings-->
   <service name="Service1" interface="tns:Interface1">
      <endpoint name="HttpEndpoint" 
                binding="tns:HttpBinding" 
                address="http://www.example.com/rest/"/>
      <endpoint name="SoapEndpoint" 
                binding="tns:SoapBinding" 
                address="http://www.example.com/soap/"/>
   </service>
</description>

 

Example WSDL

Websphere MQ

As per IBM notes

IBM WebSphere MQ can transport any type of data as messages, enabling businesses to build flexible, reusable architectures such as service-oriented architecture (SOA) environments. It works with a broad range of computing platforms, applications, web services and communications protocols for security-rich message delivery. WebSphere MQ provides a communications layer for visibility and control of the flow of messages and data inside and outside your organization.”

WebSphere MQ provides:

  • Versatile messaging integration from mainframe to mobile that provides a single, robust messaging backbone for dynamic heterogeneous environments.
  • Message delivery with security-rich features that produce auditable results.
  • High-performance message transport to deliver data with improved speed and reliability.
  • Administrative features that simplify messaging management and reduce time spent using complex tools.
  • Open standards development tools that support extensibility and business growth

More details can be availed from IBM website

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For more information on Load testing IBM Websphere MQ using Jmeter check here.

Symmetric Encryption Vs Asymmetric Encryption

Symmetric Encryption

  • Symmetric encryption is the oldest and best-known technique.
  • A secret key, which can be a number, a word, or just a string of random letters, is applied to the text of a message to change the content in a particular way.This might be as simple as shifting each letter by a number of places in the alphabet.
  • Symmetric encryption uses the identical key to both encrypt and decrypt the data. 
  • As long as both sender and recipient know the secret key, they can encrypt and decrypt all messages that use this key.

Examples of Symmetric Encryption includes: DES, Triple-DES (3DES), IDEA, CAST5, BLOWFISH, TWOFISH.

Asymmetric Encryption

  • This encryption technique is born from the disadvantage of Symmetric Encryption.
  • Asymmetric encryption, in which there are two related keys–a key pair(A public Key and a Private Key). 
  • A public key is made freely available to anyone who might want to send you a message. A second, private key is kept secret, so that only you know it. 
  • Any message (text, binary files, or documents) that are encrypted by using the public key can only be decrypted by applying the same algorithm, but by using the matching private key. 
  • Any message that is encrypted by using the private key can only be decrypted by using the matching public key.

Examples of Asymmetric Encryption includes: RSA, DSA.

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